Object Complements vs
Subject Complements


Object Complements


They are words or group of words that follow and modify the direct object in a sentence.

Example:

  • She makes me happy.


  • "me" is the direct object and “happy” is the object complement in this sentence.
  • I caught the thief stealing the money.


  • "The thief" is the direct object and "stealing the money" is the object complement in this sentence.

  • Everybody wanted him to join the club.


  • "him" is the direct object and "to join the club" is the object complement in this sentence.


    Subject Complements


    They are words or group of words that follow and modify a linking verb in a sentence.

    Example:

  • My father is an engineer and he is so good at it.


  • "Engineer" and "so good" are subject complements that modify the subject "my father" and the linking verb here is "to be".

    Note: there are two types of subject complements:

    Predicate adjective and predicate noun

    In the example above "so good" is a predicate adjective that refers to the subject "my father" however; "engineer" is a predicate noun that refers to the subject "my father".

    Some mostly used linking verbs are:

    To be / to become / to look / to smell / to feel / to taste / /to grow / to seem / to sound to appear etc.


    The storm became stronger.
    The pillows feel soft.
    The sky looks clear.
    The cake smells good.
    The bread tastes sweet.
    His idea sounds sensible.
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