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If Clauses / Conditionals


A conditional sentence has two clauses: Main clause and Subordinate clause. (If Clause)

Main ClauseIf Clause
Alicia will tidy her roomif she has time

Also See:

Wish Clauses
Unless
In Case
If Conditionals Exercises
If Clauses Tests
If clauses have three sub categories:


First Conditional IF


Type 1- True In the present or future

-If the weather is nice, we usually sit in the garden. (present)
-If the weather is nice tomorrow, we will sit in the garden. (future)

See First Conditional Details


Second Conditional IF


Type 2- Untrue (contrary to the fact) In the present or future

-If it were our day off today, we would have a barbecue in
the garden. (present)

-If it were our day off tomorrow, we would have a barbecue in
the garden. (future)

See Second Conditional Details


Third Conditional IF


Type 3- Untrue (contrary to the fact) in the past

-If the weather had been nice yesterday, we would have sat in
the garden.(past)

-If it had been our day off yesterday, we would have had a barbecue in
the garden.(past)

See Third Conditional Details




Present (do/does) or Simple Future (will)


-If it doesn't rain tomorrow, we will go on a picnic.
-I will visit my parents after work if I have time.
-They will come to the cinema with us if they leave work early enough.
-If she fails that exam, her life will change a lot.


-Perhaps she will come tomorrow. Then we will study together.
-If she comes tomorrow, we will study together.


-Perhaps she will get her salary next week. Then she'll pay back what she
owes me.
-If she gets her salary next week, she will pay back what she owes me.


-Perhaps there will be another rise in prices soon. Then everybody will
suffer.
-If there is another rise in prices soon, everybody will suffer.


-Perhaps it won't be her day off tomorrow. Then I'll go shopping alone.
-If it isn't her day off tomorrow, I'll go shopping alone.


UNLESS:

We usually use “unless” in order to mean “if not”.

You won't learn English unless you practice a lot.
You won't learn English if you don't practice a lot.

Unless you come, I won’t invite you again.
If you don’t come, I won’t invite you again.


Unless you leave home at once, you will be late for work.
If you don’t leave home at once, you will be late for work.


"Unless" is followed by the condition. See more on Unless



IN CASE:


See In Case
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